#NoFryDay

May 31, 2019 is National Heat Awareness Day or #NoFryDay.

Heat Illnesses Can be Fatal – Would You Know What to Do?

Did you know your body is constantly in a struggle to disperse the heat it produces? Most of the time, you’re hardly aware of it – unless your body is exposed to more heat than it can handle. In 2017, 87 people died in the U.S. from exposure to excessive heat, according to Injury Facts, the annual statistical report on unintentional injuries produced by the National Safety Council. Heat-related illnesses can escalate rapidly, leading to delirium, organ damage and even death.

There are several heat-related illnesses, including heatstroke (the most severe), heat exhaustion and heat cramps. Those most at risk include:

  • Infants and young children
  • Elderly people
  • Pets
  • Individuals with heart or circulatory problems or other long-term illness
  • People who work outdoors
  • Athletes and people who like to exercise – especially beginners
  • Individuals taking medications that alter sweat production
  • Alcoholics and drug abusers
  • Heat Stroke

Seek medical help immediately if someone is suffering from heat stroke. Signs and symptoms include flushed skin that is very hot to the touch; rapid breathing; headache, dizziness, confusion or irrational behavior; and convulsions or unresponsiveness. The victim also will likely have stopped sweating. Do not hesitate to take action:

  • Call 911 immediately
  • Move the victim to a cool place
  • Remove outer clothing
  • Immediately cool the victim with any means at hand, preferably by immersing up to the neck in cold water (with the help of a second rescuer)
  • If immersion in cold water is not possible, place the victim in a cold shower or move to a cool area and cover as much of the body as possible with cold, wet towels
  • Do not try to force the victim to drink liquids
  • Monitor the victim’s breathing and be ready to give CPR if needed

Heat Exhaustion

When the body loses an excessive amount of salt and water, heat exhaustion can set in. People who work outdoors and athletes are particularly susceptible. Symptoms are similar to those of the flu and can include severe thirst, fatigue, headache, nausea, vomiting and, sometimes, diarrhea. Other symptoms include profuse sweating, clammy or pale skin, dizziness, rapid pulse and normal or slightly elevated body temperature. Uncontrolled heat exhaustion can evolve into heatstroke, so make sure to treat the victim quickly.

  • Move them to a shaded or air-conditioned area
  • Give them water or other cool, nonalcoholic beverages
  • Apply wet towels or having them take a cool shower

Heat Cramps

Heat cramps are muscle spasms that usually affect the legs or abdominal muscles, often after physical activity. Excessive sweating reduces salt levels in the body, which can result in heat cramps.

Workers or athletes with pain or spasms in the abdomen, arms or legs should not return to work for a few hours. Instead:

The best way to avoid a heat-related illness is to limit exposure outdoors during hot days. Air conditioning is the best way to cool off, according to the CDC. Also:

  • Drink more liquid than you think you need and avoid alcohol
  • Wear loose, lightweight clothing and a hat
  • Replace salt lost from sweating by drinking fruit juice or sports drinks
  • Avoid spending time outdoors during the hottest part of the day, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Wear sunscreen; sunburn affects the body’s ability to cool itself
  • Pace yourself when you run or otherwise exert your body

If you have questions or concerns about heat exhaustion, please consult your primary care physician. If you have questions about how to keep your body hydrated during the summer, schedule a nutrition consultation with our Registered Dietitian, Lisa James by filling out the form below!

This blog was originally published by the National Safety Council on www.nsc.org.

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